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Found 125 results

  1. Sly Reflex

    Into the Breach

    Into the Breach is a game that came from the FTL; Faster than Light guys. Instead of being a grid based real time strategy you can pause and plan out your course of attack, here we're in 3D isometric land where everything is turn based. Also I don't think this is a rogue like, or from what little I've experienced it's not show that hand yet, if it does happen to have some randomness to it. The game plays a little bit like the old turn based war games, if you've played Advance Wars or Fire Emblem you'll feel right at home here. However there are a few differences that sort of make this game unique. The first one is that you only get 3 units. You get a big walking tank that can punch things. You get a standard tank that can fire on anything as long as it has line of sight on the target and you get an artillery that can do indirect fire, helping it arc shots over terrain, but also making it so that it can't attack things directly next to it. So far, so vanilla. The biggest difference is that the way these pieces move and interact with the bad guys that pop up on the map. For instance all the units you have at your disposal can push back enemies a square. This comes in very useful, because if something happens to be in the tile where they would be knocked into, that tiles occupant takes damage as well. Remember this. Another difference is that after each turn the enemies show you directly what they're going to attack. This is where the pushing mobs about the tile set comes important. Sure you could use a tank shell to hit that big enemy up the arse, but that's going to push him right onto the city and give him what he wants anyway. The idea is you read what attack are coming and use this pushing system to save objectives and your own armour. Placing your guys in positions that leads the enemies into grouping up so that you can push them into each other and mountains to hurt them or even get them to attack each other is part of the strategy here. You can also instakill any ground based enemies by pushing them into the water. The final big difference is that the fight you are taking place in only lasts a set number of turns, usually enemies burst from the ground each turn, you are thoroughly outnumbered and the general gist of the game is to survive. You have limited resources and it looks like you're just meant to cling onto the objective before moving onto the next mission. There are sub objectives, some of which say you can kill all of the enemies, but for the most it looks like you'll be keeping the wolves from the door before being whisked off to deal with the next insect eruption. Because of the nature of the skirmishes taking a few minutes before you're moved on it makes an ideal game to play when you've not got much time, I can imagine this being a really good phone game for that reason. Not to say it's without depth because of that, there's going to be plenty of head scratching trying to work out how to smash the fuck out of the attackers without them destroying your buildings and setting everything on fire. It's going to be one of those games that's deceptively simple to grasp but really difficult to master. It's left a good first impressions, maybe not quite as captivating as FTL was when that originally hit, but I think most people will really enjoy it if they're into turn based strategy.
  2. DANGERMAN

    Gunman Clive

    I've seen this game around quite a bit but not paid too much attention to it, but the creator started a thread on Gaf the other day detailing how it had sold. If I remember right the pc/mac version hadn't sold much at all, the ios a bit, Android a decent amount because it had been featured in the Staff Picks section, but the platform it had sold best on was the 3DS. Again it had been featured, still is under Winter Picks (or something like that), but the key thing for me is that it's only £1.99 It plays a bit like a not as hard Megaman, not that it's easy, just that it's not as hard as Megaman. You can jump and you can shoot, you can't shoot up, you can't shoot diagonally, but you can duck. The stages are pretty short, you're scored based on how quick you do them, and at the end of a set of stages there's a boss fight. The boos fights might be my favourite thing about the game, they aren't massively hard, it just takes a bit of old fashioned skill and patience to beat them. It does suffer the way Megaman did in that it's ever so slightly unfair. There's plenty of times where you'll jump, which will make the screen scroll forward, spawning an enemy to fire or fly at you and knock you to your death. You have unlimited lives though, it's just a case of starting from a checkpoint (more often than not the start of the stage). It's not very long, but apparently the 3DS version has extra stuff. It does look pretty nice, the 3D isn't too intrusive, and it is pretty cheap compared to most stuff on the 3DS
  3. Blakey

    Hollow Knight

    Continuing my Indie binge with Hollow Knight. Heard lots of good things about this game earlier this year and saw a Let's Play from Easy Allies of the first two-ish hours of it, has been on my Steam wishlist ever since. For those that don't know, it's an Indie Metroidvania game set in an eerie melancholic bug-world. I've enjoyed it quite a lot, being new to the Metroidvania genre I didn't really know what to expect, I've seen an awful lot of great indie Metroidvania games and kind of got turned off them in the past as there's just so many, I'm glad I gave this a go though because it's now a genre I'd like to explore more. For starters it doesn't hold your hand at all, you get a very brief control tutorial and are then left to explore the world. It doesn't explain anything at all, and if I hadn't of watched the EZA Let's Play I would've been a bit lost on where to go and what to do, luckily that gave me a brief idea. It was still a bit disconcerting exploring areas and not knowing where the fuck you are in the slightest, no map, no idea where the next Rest point is, no idea where the entrance to the next area is or anything though. Luckily you realise how the map system works pretty early on and then discover a vendor to add new areas to it, mark your location on the map etc. All incredibly useful. The gameplay loop is pretty similar to Souls I guess, if you die you loose all your 'Geo', you get Geo by killing enemies. The most innovative mechanic is that when you kill enemies you get souls that you then use to replenish your health, which adds to the whole risk/reward system of the game as it makes you want to attack more in combat in order to get more Souls to heal in the heat of a battle, it is a balance at times as your Soul supply can be used for other things too. You use a small sword for the combat (called a 'nail') which enabled you to hit enemies in any 360 degree direction, there's a lot of enemy variety on offer, when you go into a new area you have to learn their mannerisms all over again, there's a few areas with traps for you to fall into (similar to Souls) too, it always feels fresh and involving. It has that Souls feeling about it to about worrying where the next save point is, knowing you've got 1000+ Geo on you and whether to venture into the next area where a boss may be waiting or head back to a previous area and save. I won't give too much away but new mechanics are introduced as you go along that unlock new locales, one changes the platforming significantly and one changes the combat to a significant degree as well, the game never points you to these so presumably you could go the entire game without discovering them. There's also a system similar to the rings in Souls where you can get slightly more Souls when you defeat an enemy, a bit more health etc. but the slots are incredibly limited at this time meaning you have to choose very wisely which you want to equip. The game looks absolutely stunning, it has a really unique art-design about it, it's cartoonish but the backgrounds and levels managed to look realistic and give a very lived-in, ancient kind of vibe. By far and away the best thing about the game is the music though, it is just absolutely incredible and makes the each area feel special and meaningful, when you go to your first town and a certain song plays it's just so melancholic and haunting at the same time, it really is very special. The noises the characters you meet along the way make are fantastic too, they put so much personality in them just from gibberish and grunts. A few pics:
  4. Duck

    Slay The Spire

    As i kinda explained in the new purchases thread this is rogue-like RPG dungeon crawl/deck builder mash up that is currently in early access. (it's about 12 quid) When start the game you choose from 1 of 3 characters all of which have different perks and attributes, then another perk/gift much like in rogue-likes/Dark Souls/Hearthstone etc. Your aim is to get to the end of the game without dying as it's perma-death. Game over. I think there currently 3 Acts at the moment and in each map you're given a map and have to chose one of 4 starting points at the bottom, with the boss at the top finishing the act. Once you've chosen you get to pick the next step to move along that path... like this.. - Unknown is Unknown . It's a story event. I could end well (with a new passive perk or something) or badly. - Merchant is a shop where you can buy new cards or items. He usually has some sales too. - Treasure is a treasure chest - Rest you have the option to gain some of your heal back or upgrade a card. - Enemy is a enemy. - Elite is like a mini boss. You see this map even before you set off so you can plan a bit. Do i go after that treasure or have a rest on the other path?.. etc Risk/reward, it's cool. Ok, now the turn-based combat. It's all card/item based. Looks like this.. Like Hearthstone/most card based board games, at the start of each turn the player has a certain about points that they can spend to lay cards. This can be modified with other cards/relics as you progress tho. And like Dominion/rogue likes you start off with very basic cards but after every fight you get to choose 1 of 3 cards to add to your 'deck'. So as you are progress and building your deck, your character is getting better. Enemies/bosses drop loot like money which can be spend at the shop or relics which give you a passive ability. Once you've spent you're points, you end the turn and the remaining cards are put into the discard pile. When your draw pile is empty, the discard pile is shuffled and you start again. That's it basically. It's simple but fuck, it's reeeally good. It merges the deck building with the rogue like stuff really nicely. I wish every turn-based RPG had the same combat/deck building loop this has. It's much more approachable and pick up and play than any card-based video game i've played too. Even more so than Hearthstone. But it still does a lot of the things i like about deck builders. So, yeah if you've ever thought of giving a card game a go but were scared off how impenetrable they can be. Then this maybe the gateway drug. Very addictive. Great game, still in early access too so it should only get better.
  5. Sly Reflex

    Moonlighter

    Moonlighter is a game about running a shop by day, and adventuring at night. That is the most basic way of explaining it without getting too complicated. You want to know more about it than that, so here goes, Moonlighter is viewed top down and is split into a few parts. There's a bit where you manage a shop and a bit where you go out adventuring to stock the shop with items to sell.. Lets get the fighting bit out the way first. There are 4 (maybe 5) dungeons in the game that work off tile sets and are randomly generated each time you enter them. You know the deal. The fighting is not complicated, there's a few weapons that you can equip, 2 at a time, and then go hit or shoot stuff. You can heal yourself if you have potions, as well as use and evasive roll which has a very large invincibility period. Killing enemies or opening chests in the dungeon has loot in them, or artefacts as the game calls them. It's these artefacts you sell in your shop. Except it's not as easy as that, because of course it never is. Item inventory plays a big part in this. Remember all those times you spent moving stuff about in Resi 4 trying to get everything packed in? Well, it's the same here, except it's got a different spin. Items from chests sometimes have requirements on them. They either have to be kept in the left or right of your bag, or the top or bottom. Now this doesn't sound too bad, but there's other items with arrows on them. You have to read the banner on these items, because it all comes into how you pack your bag. Some of them immediately destroy items if the arrow is facing towards and item, some items break an item they're pointing to when you teleport back to town, other can break if you take too many hits, there's an item that changes whatever is pointed at to the item it is so you can transmog a bit of junk into something nice and finally one where the arrowed item sends something home to your box back in the shop. Dungeons are split into 4 floors, with a boss on the fourth floor. They gradually get harder as you plunge the depths. You have a pendant that can teleport you back to the shop, however the deeper you go the more gold it costs to send you home. If you are caught short on gold you can also sell items to a mirror which you find when you go down a floor. You get a percentage of whatever the item you put ins worth. There's also another item called the catalyst which allows you to put a gate down and return to the point you're at for 2000 gold each time, although I'm sure this will go up as you get further into the game. This is a one use only, you have to pay each time, but I can imagine once you're rolling in it plopping it outside the boss door will be the smart thing to do. I think the biggest pain in the arse here is selling stuff to the mirror, instead of assigning it a button so you can send shit right to the mirror you have to directly drop the item in and it sort of feels like it was done with a mouse in mind and not a controller. It's easily patchable, whether they'll do that is another question entirely. If you do not survive the dungeon and your HP reaches zero, it spits you out. Any items in your bag are lost for good. However, items on the top line of the inventory are kept, so if there's something really important you need you can bring it out with you no matter what. When you're in town you have a shop where you can put the items on a table and open the doors. People come in and depending on how you've priced stuff will take of leave it. Occasionally you'll get a rich person come in that will buy inflated prices. More likely you'll get shoplifters who you have to apprehend once they've picked something up and tried to do a runner. If they get out the door your items are lost. What to do with the gold you earn from all this? There's a blacksmith, a enchanter, a trader, a decorator and a banker you can spend gold on to bring into your town. These all use gold and items found in the dungeons to craft and upgrade weapons and armour, as well as enchanting them. The trader can get you items at an inflated price if you can't find them yourself, and the decorator allows you to put RPG like buffs on your shop, such and making people move faster or tip more. The shop itself is also upgradable. You start off with a chest and a table with a bed to sleep in. As you progress you get more storage, bargain bins as well as more places to put decorative items that later the way your customers act. The bed gives you a set amount of HP above your standard health, I think it's bugged because it specifically says you get the buff after sleeping in the bed but you get it whenever you return from a dive. There's also cash registers that add tips to the base cost of an item which help mark up those items you cannot sell for a lot. There's other stuff in here as well, stuff like supply and demand also rear their heads, if you flood the market with a certain item people will refuse to buy it at a regular price. I think that's about it. In a way it reminds me of Rogue Legacy or The Swindle in that although you can die and lose your stuff, there's a part of the game where everything is still set in stone and is safe as long as you've banked it. Although I've not actually seen the boss of the first world I'm not that far off it, depending on how hard it is I'll have probably beaten it the next time I play. I'm wearing the thickest armour I can, I'm wielding the toughest weapons I can craft, it's just a case of getting to the fourth floor and giving it a hiding so I can get to the next dungeon and repeat until the end. This game isn't for everyone, but there's a select few here that would be all over it. It's also the type of game I reckon would play well on Switch.
  6. Hendo

    Celeste

    Super hard indie platformer? Count me in and watch as I never complete it. This is made by the people who made Towerfall and although it is 2D and retro styled, it’s a completely different thing as it’s a single player game, more like Super Meat Boy. There’s optional collectibles (strawberries) but the thing I find concerning is part of it is gated by other collectibles. Featured in this video by Dunkey: I’m on the third chapter and it hasn’t been too difficult so far but I can see where it’s headed.
  7. radiofloyd

    The Messenger

    I’ve played through the first three levels so I’m still on the linear portion of the game (according to reviews the game transforms into a full-on metroidvania after a few hours). So far it’s been an enjoyable platformer/hack and slash game, with the standout being the visuals and music The first two levels I played through in handheld mode but tonight I played using the pro controller and it’s much more enjoyable. The game has a mechanic where if you attack something mid air, it allows you to jump again, it’s a little bit uncomfortable in handheld mode but as I suspected it works like a charm using a proper controller. Not to mention the game looks beautiful on a big screen.
  8. radiofloyd

    Hyper Light Drifter

    Hyper Light Drifter was one of those games funded way back in the hey day of Kickstarter in 2013 (and eventually released this year). They had a goal of $27,000 and raised $645,000. It's not hard to see why when the game looks like this: I've played 90 minutes so far. The game is clearly inspired by games like Zelda, Metroid and Dark Souls. Characters don't speak and there is no text in the game so basically you learn about the world from your interactions with it. The difficulty of the game is certainly pitched at challenging. It's not one hit kill like Titan Souls (a game HLD resembles a lot) but at the same time I've already died a few times. Especially in the dungeon like areas you warp down to in elevators. Exploration is very Zelda like and there are lots of places to find off the main path. The audio is quite minimal in the game.
  9. radiofloyd

    Pool Panic

    I liked the look of this when Nintendo showed it in their indie showcase, so I took a chance on when it was discounted a little recently. But I’m not sure whether or how much I like it. I’ve just been playing the single player mode. As you can see in the trailer, it’s a kind of wacky, fun pool game, you play as the cue ball who you can freely move around and the aim is to knock all the other balls in the level/stage/pool “table” into various pockets. Of course this involves playing a shot like you normally would in pool or snooker, but it also usually involves various interactions with the environment and many of the balls don’t just stand still either. You move your character, the cue ball, with the left analogue stick, and when you’re taking a shot, you move the direction the cue stick is aiming with the right analogue stick. This part is a bit fiddly and it’s the main reason why I have mixed feelings about the game. But it works a little bit better with a pro controller than with the switch’s analogue stick. Aside from clearing the table and potting the black ball, each level has other challenges you can aim for - completing the level within a certain time, completing the level within a certain number of shots, potting all the balls in the level (many of them are hidden) and also making sure you don’t accidentally pot the white ball. I usually fail most if not all of these, but I don’t really care. The game has a vibrant, fun, colourful art style in the spirit of games like Cuphead and Hidden Folks, and the levels have lovely music too, so on the artistic front it’s no slouch. For now I’m just going to keep playing in 15-20 minute bursts.
  10. radiofloyd

    ABZÛ

    http://www.abzugame.com/ Anyway ABZÛ is an underwater adventure from the art director of Journey. I don't normally create threads for games after I've finished them, but ABZÛ is only two hours so it's kind of unavoidable. I haven't played Journey so I have no idea how similar it is to that, but in terms of "how much of a walking/swimming simulator" is it, I would say the game is pretty similar to Firewatch (and similar in terms of value for money, as impressive as both games are I'm still glad I bought them on sale and not full price). Essentially in the game you swim through a series of rooms and corridors. There are collectibles to find and light gameplay elements to the game but really they are a negligible part of the experience. Occasionally the game has on rails sections where you are swept along with the current (or the game simply takes control away from you) and these are very impressive. In general, the entire game is impressive, and enjoyable to play. The music is beautiful, one of the best game soundtracks I've ever heard. Like I said in my Steam review, of the four indie games I've completed this year (ABZÛ, Firewatch, Hyper Light Drifter and Oxenfree), ABZÛ would be my favourite. One of the reasons I like it is that it reminded me of the underwater levels in Spyro (and the ambient music reminded me of Spyro). Another reason is that it is an uplifting game, which is pretty rare. I think this would be a good game for parents to play with their children. I give it 8/10.
  11. radiofloyd

    Rogue Legacy

    Put a good chunk of time into this today. For a 400mb download you might think it would run on anything but it seems to be one of the most demanding indie games I've played. It was unplayable using a laptop with only integrated graphics. I managed to get my own laptop going which also chugged at the game's default resolution but at lower resolutions it ran fine - except when your character has any weird traits like colour-blindness which slow the game down again. But that's not really a problem as you can mostly avoid those. Performance issues aside, it's a cool game. The graphics and music are fine, nothing much to say. Basically you pick a hero, go into a Castlevania style dungeon, inevitably die, spend the coins you earned on stat and equipment upgrades, then go in again as a new hero. Dungeons are randomised but there is an NPC called the Architect who will "lock" a dungeon's design if you like. It's unforgiving but not in an overly unfair way, so it does have that Dark Souls fun/addiction factor. Initially you'll be dying after a few rooms but once you understand how the game's combat and movement works (and how the enemies behave) you'll start surviving for longer and reaching new areas. Basically it feels like a natural enough evolution of traditional roguelikes.
  12. radiofloyd

    Gorogoa

    Gorogoa is a hand drown indie puzzle game that has been in development for years and years and was finally released today. It's gotten some very good reviews. Basically the game involves you interacting with pictures and moving them around in order to cause something to happen or open a way forward etc. It starts off easily enough but soon gets devilish. I've played it for an hour but am well stumped on Chapter 3 so I've taken a break, but I won't give up... Lovely game so far.
  13. radiofloyd

    Elite: Dangerous

    Way back in January 2013 this game raised £1.5 million on kickstarter, was released in 2015, followed by a Horizons "season pass" which looks like it is receiving its final major update this year. I bought the base game at some stage during the last two years and have finally gotten around to playing it. I've played it for over four hours so far. The game has a number of tutorial missions (and videos) which explain some of the fundamentals of the game, piloting and landing your ship, combat, travelling between planets. There's certainly a learning curve but I think I have the basic piloting, landing and navigation parts down now. I can't really speak for combat, I completed the basic combat tutorial but I haven't yet encountered any combat in the main "open" game, which I've played around 90 minutes of. You start off with a ship, 1000 credits and a mission to deliver data to another port. I completed that mission and you are then told which places to visit if you wish to learn about various aspects of the game. Each port has a mission board where you can take on a variety of missions, but you can't take on missions of a higher rank than your current rank. I'm still at the starting rank "Penniless". So far I've completed one extra mission, to supply copper. I haven't even scratched the surface of the surface of the game but just playing this most basic part of the game has been fun so far. I've been playing on PC, with a controller. Aesthetically, the game looks and sounds beautiful. The hyper space jumps or whatever they are called are amazingly eerie.
  14. radiofloyd

    Rakuen

    Rakuen is a lovely new adventure game that first caught my eye when I was trawling through Steam's upcoming list months if not a year or two ago. It didn't seemed to have any hype whatsoever but it has just been released to some excellent reviews. I've played two hours and it's excellent. You play as a hospitalised boy who can also travel to the fanastical world of "Rakuen". The two worlds are of course connected. From what I've played it's an rpg maker adventure game that actually reminds me a little in tone of Zelda Breath of the Wild, and also Undertale. I don't want to spoil anything about the game but so far it's easily been worth the €9.99.
  15. radiofloyd

    Pyre

    I've played over an hour of this now in about three 20 minute bursts. I like it but it is very different to Transistor (and the early parts of Bastion that I played). The game is part visual novel, part rpg. It's not as text heavy as a game like Sunless Sea (nor remotely as free-form), but the story is told through text like in the second picture above. Pyre is not remotely an action game. It's been described as a sports game in some reviews, but I think that's a bit laughably over the top. The "combat", known as Rites, does resemble a sport in that you have to take a ball and carry it into your opponents "pyre"...but I think this is the one element of the game that does resemble Transistor to some extent. Actually now that I'm typing this maybe it is closer to basketball than Transistor but anyway, I'm not going to call it a "sports" game just yet. During the basketball match (I've given up) you can perform actions like sprinting, jumping, passing and even throwing the ball into the enemy's pyre (oh my god it's basketball). If you don't have the ball you can cast your aura, i.e. attack an enemy. Each team has three characters and you can only control one character at a time. If a character is attacked they are banished for a certain period of time. Each individual character has stats that govern how much damage they do to an enemy pyre, how long they are banished for etc. Each character also has a skill tree and you can pick new abilities when they level up, and each character can also equip one "talisman" that has some kind of stat boosting effect. Those are the rpg elements. The visual novel elements are basically everything else. You move from point to point on the map (so far the game has been almost entirely linear) and this will usually trigger some kind of story event or conversation among your party that is told through text. In one hour I haven't experience much of the story but basically your characters are exiled in some kind of wasteland, and completing this rites ceremony seems to be some way to obtain freedom for them. There is no full voice acting (the characters make a few squables when they speak a la Zelda) except for the character who seems to control the rites, I don't know what it is but his voice seems to remind me of movies like Tron and Logan's Run. So far, it's an intriguing game, and you definitely can't accuse Supergiant of retreading old ground. Artistically, in terms of visuals and music, it's too early to comment but the signs are that this will match their earlier games.
  16. radiofloyd

    Where the Water Tastes Like Wine

    Where The Water Tastes Like Wine is a game where (the water tastes like wine) you wander around America during the Great Depression. You literally walk around a 3D map of America, from state to state and city to city. The actual walking is the weakest element of the game, with this bizarre mechanic where if you hold down the left control button and tap musical notes as they pop up on screen using the four directional buttons, while continuing to use WASD to move, your character will walk faster. It's as clunky as it sounds and I can't imagine why they chose to implement it this way, but anyway... I've played enough indie games to forgive some minor clunkiness. Your character can also hitch a ride from cars that are travelling along the roads. But that's not what the game is about. The game is about collecting stories and sharing stories. By interacting with various places as you walk around the map you will collect new stories or enhance stories you have already collected. The highlight of the game is the characters you meet at various campsites, who ask you to tell them various stories (i.e. a happy story, an exciting story, a sad story). These characters are beautifully illustrated and voice acted, and have stories of their own that they will share with you. After you talk to them they will show you the next location where they are headed. So far I've found it very enjoyable, and it's a game that can easily be played in short bursts.
  17. radiofloyd

    Battle Brothers

    Battle Brothers is a turn-based strategy-rpg that spent a while in Early Access and was released on PC last year. I've been playing on the default easy difficulty, which is an enjoyable enough challenge that I don't feel like immediately starting over on Normal. Essentially in the game there are the combat parts and the non-combat parts (a bit like Total War...the overworld map also reminds me of Total War, although the similarities probably end there). Combat is tile based, turn based, and plays fairly similarly to any number of srpgs, with different weapon types, abilities and other factors like height advantage etc. Characters that die are permanently dead. Characters can also be injured, which depending on the injury will have various negative effects. You take (and deal) two types of damage, armour damage and health damage. The overworld map, considerably zoomed out, looks like this: Zoomed in a bit more it looks like this: So essentially you hire mercenaries to fight. Mercenaries have food and gold requirements. Food can be bought at towns and gold can be obtained by completing quests or selling items. The game has a day night cycle and this affects a lot of things (i.e. your mercenaries wages are deducted once a day, injuries take so many days to heal, equipment takes a certain amount of time to be repaired etc). There are scenarios in the game that I assume have a story but I'm just playing a general campaign. Quests so far have been either of the combat or non-combat variety. Quest that involve battles are usually nearby the towns that give them, whereas quests that involve accompanying trade caravans can mean travelling long distances. The game has a quite nice graphical style. The music is pretty forgettable and low key so it's one to listen to your cd collection while playing, which I don't mind. There's more to the game than I've mentioned, but that's the basic gist of it.
  18. VA-11 Hall-A (a.k.a. Valhalla) is a cyberpunk visual novel/lite bartender simulator, released in June 2016. The bartending element is fun and simple. Characters will occasionally ask for drinks, sometimes they will tell you directly what they want, sometimes just what kind of drink they want, and you have to choose the right drink and prepare it correctly. It's not complicated and in the two hours I've played I've yet to make a mistake. If only another game I've been playing was as sensibly designed as this... I thought the game had been kickstarted but googling it shows I was wrong. The wikipedia page has a lot of background information on the game. I can see references to things like Policenauts and Blade Runner and Valhalla is definitely in that vein. The characters that come to the bar have been interesting and it seems like the game is going to have a lot of recurring characters which is cool. Aesthetically, the game looks lovely, not least the title screen which has a kind of PS1-era feeling. In fact it might just be me but the game kind of screams PS1-era Final Fantasy... Before each day of work you can set the music in the jukebox, and once you are playing you can just sit back and listen, or switch between songs as you like. The game has other neat small touches like the fact that you can change the channel on the tv. Also, I liked the reference to Stein's Gate.
  19. radiofloyd

    Darkest Dungeon

    Quoting the kickstarter - "Darkest Dungeon is a challenging gothic roguelike RPG about the psychological stresses of adventuring. Descend at your peril!" Anyway, it was funded for over $300,000 in March 2014, spent a year on Early Access and eventually released in January this year. It's due out on PS4 later in the summer. It got good reviews and and has a "very positive" Steam user rating with around 15,000 votes. I've played it for an hour so far, it's cool. The game is structured like Sunless Sea in that you have a base, a safe haven, where you can buy provisions, recruit new members, take on quests etc etc. You can only set out with a party of four each time, but you can have way more than four people hired. One of the things you can do in the base camp or "hamlet" is assign people to certain activities which will reduce stress (like dread in Sunless Sea). If someone is assigned to an activity, you can't take them with you on your next trip. I'm not going to drone on about the mechanics in the game, but it is pretty similar to Sunless Sea really. Combat is turn based. Your party stands in formation and different characters have a preferred position...it's not what it sounds like. Both yours and the enemies position will affect the range of your attacks. That's all I can say about it so far. I did the introductory quest.
  20. radiofloyd

    Crossing Souls

    Crossing Souls is an indie adventure game made in Spain that was kickstarted way back in December 2014. I’ve played about an hour of it so far. The game has a heavy 80s kids-on-an-adventure film feeling, so I think a lot of you would like it. In fact so far it has felt like I’m playing through a film, which is cool. The lovely music helps. You play as a gang of five kids on their summer holidays (in 1986 to be precise). Each kid has unique abilities and you can switch between them on the fly. You start off with just one member of the gang but quickly round up rest as you move through town on your way to meet the final fifth member in the gang’s secret treehouse, which is as far as I’ve played.
  21. DifferentClass

    Axiom Verge

    I might as well say something about this since I'm stuck. So on the surface this is basically a classic Metroid game under another name, and I'd even say it's classic Metroid a little under the surface, too. It's hard to get away from the comparisons. But it does have it's own stuff. Gameplay-wise it is less predictable than it initially looks. You can see that there are ares you can't traverse but it doesn't quite use the same kind of abilities as you'd expect from a game so inspired by Metroid and Axiom Verge certainly does a pretty good job of surprising you. I kind of don't want to talk about them, but I will say the drone is pretty inspired. It plays a pretty good shooter. The enemies are really fiendish which really do cause a problem not long into the game and the weapons you get are weird and unexpected, too. They maybe a bit too situational so you will use the default a lot but there is some satisfaction in figuring out the best way of using the weirder ones. It feels quite Turbo-Grafix-y more than Metroid-y in terms of action, actually. I don't think I quite understand the story, though. There is a bit too much jargon that comes across really stupid, sometimes, but the atmosphere is spot on. The environments do pull off the surreal, dreamy, alien sci-fi thing really well. The soundtrack helps a lot; it's mostly really good. I know this has past a lot of people by, it hasn't had much attention for some reason but I would say it stands alongside Shovel Knight as a good modern take on an older style of game. I kinda hate it now because being stuck really blows chunks, especially on games like this.
  22. Blakey

    Unravel

    Started playing this today, put in about 3 hours. Not really sure what to make of it at the moment, the game looks bloody gorgeous (You can see where Coldwood spent that EA money!), the soundtrack is great, but at its heart it just feels like an average platformer really. If I had to compare it I'd say it feels most like LittleBigPlanet, that kind of floatiness to the controls (if that makes sense) happens in Unravel too, it definitely isn't a tight platformer like Ori and the Blind Forest or Donkey Kong Country, and I don't think it was ever trying to be like those games in its design, but the controls could've been tighter and snappier in my view, from what I've played anyway. What I didn't realise going in was how incredibly infuriating and frustrating a game it is, it just gets me so fucking riled up it's unreal, I've got stuck twice already and had to look up what I need to do online, was just pottering about for 15 minutes trying to get past a certain section and of course I find what I need to do, feel like an idiot and I'm on my way. Some of the problems can be put down to the timing-based platforming sections I've encountered I guess (where the controls don't help), coupled with the harsh check-pointing employed. You can figure out what you need to do in order to progress, almost complete an entire section, accidently drop into some water and suddenly have to start all the way back at the previous checkpoint, just seems needless really. Despite the issues the game has and its mediocrity (in platforming terms) I am still vaguely enjoying it, it's pleasant enough, the environs are amazing and Yarny is charming enough to keep me playing, but I can already tell its going to be a bit of a slog if it goes on for any longer than the 5-6 hours I'm assuming it lasts.
  23. radiofloyd

    Oxenfree

    Oxenfree was released way back in January which I guess makes it a retro title by today's standards. I don't know about the PS4 or Xbox One but it's currently heavily discounted on Steam so now is as good a time to pick it up as any. As it turns out, I already own it. It looks like this. I just played it for sixteen minutes so I can give you sixteen minutes worth of impressions. So far it's been a pleasant side-scrolling walk and talk simulator. Not a million miles from Life is Strange if Life is Strange was side-scrolling. The conversations so far have been kind of typical preppy American teenage stuff. At the beginning of the game the characters are heading to some kind of after dark party on an island. The main point I'd like to make is that the game has a really good electronic soundtrack. The art style has a bit of Kentucky Route Zero.
  24. DANGERMAN

    Doki Doki Literature Club

    I don't think anyone has started a thread about Doki Doki Literature Club, but I've a feeling that's not quite how it's spelt and the search can be a bit shit @spatular put me on to this but apparently its doing the rounds on some of the bigger forums. It's a visual novel with a slight dating element to it. Basically once you join the club you all start sharing your poems with each other, you get to pick 20 words the night before to impress whichever of the girls you like (there's 3 very distinct girls you can impress) So far that's probably enough for you to judge the people playing this, especially Spatular, but without going in to things and spoiling what the game is, it's very much not that It's free on Steam, seems to have taken everyone else on my friends list 4 hours, I went out and left it running so it's going to take me about 10. Its an interesting thing so far though
  25. radiofloyd

    Thimbleweed Park

    I don't usually sit down and play a game for two hours when I'm trying it for the first time but I've just done that with this game, the kickstarted "classic point and click adventure" from Ron Gilbert and co. This game is great. It's funny. Of course it has references to previous adventure games. It looks lovely and everything works really smoothly. There are two difficulty modes, hard and casual, but they read more like normal and "simplified". You're not allowed post in this thread if you chose casual. Anyway, I don't want to spoil anything that's happened in the opening couple of hours but I'm strapped in for the ride.
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